How Many Carbs are in Strawberries

How many carbs are in strawberries? Strawberries will always be the favorite fruit, not just of kids but even of adults. From ice cream to fruit shakes, every person simply loves strawberries. No wonder almost all kinds of food products out there will have a strawberry flavor counterpart. But apart from its sweet and delicious taste, strawberries also have a lot of nutrients in them. This fruit contains different vitamins and minerals that will give you amazing health benefits. For some who are really health-conscious, they might wonder how many carbs there are in strawberries considering that this fruit is so sweet. In reality, the amount of carbs depends on the size of the fruit.

 

How Many Carbs are in Strawberries – Nutrition Facts

How Many Carbs are in Strawberries Nutrition Facts

The carbohydrate content of strawberries varies depending on the serving. For example, if you eat one half cup of strawberries you get to have 5 grams of carbohydrates, 1.5 grams of fiber and 26 calories.

For one big strawberry, you get to have 1.4 gram of carbohydrates, .5 grams fiber and 6 calories.

Few people would know that strawberries have a lot of health benefits – they’re known to be a rich source of not just vitamin C but even manganese. Strawberries also contain phytonutrients which helps the body to protect itself from damage. Phytonutrients ensure that the body’s cells are protected from any damage.

There are several studies that would show how strawberries can fight against cancer. Apart from this, strawberries have other known health benefits.

They can be used in burning stored fat and they can boost your short-term memory. According to the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they can boost your memory by up to 100% in just about 8 weeks so adding strawberry to your diet can help your memory.

Since strawberries contain soluble fiber, they can also be used for better digestion.

This is strongly recommended for those who are suffering from constipation. If you’re really having a hard time in moving your bowels, strawberries can definitely help.

Another benefit of strawberries is that they can reduce your risk of having cardiovascular disease. They contains flavonoids which are known to lower religious the risk of having heart disease.

Did you know that strawberries can also strengthen your bones as they contain vitamins and minerals like potassium, magnesium and vitamin K which are essential for bone health.

With all the vitamins and other nutrients that you can find in this food, strawberries are also known for their anti-aging properties. They contain biotin which is responsible in helping you have stronger hair and nails.

Another is that they contains a logic acid which protects the elastic fibers in your body to avoid sagging. Also, strawberries are known to promote hair growth.

According to the archives of Ophthalmology, when you eat three or more servings of strawberries, it can reduce your risk of having macular degeneration which results in vision loss.

With the different benefits that you can get in eating strawberries, there are a lot of reasons why you should have this fruit.

 

Frozen Strawberries

Frozen_Strawberries

A lot of people like frozen strawberries. But they may be also curious as to whether frozen strawberries are still nutritious and can be part of a healthy diet.

The good news is that when you eat frozen strawberries they can give you 5 grams of fiber.

One cup of unsweetened pureed strawberries has 76 calories with no fat and can give you about 227% of the recommended dietary intake needed for vitamin C.

Strawberries can also give you other nutrients like folate, manganese and vitamin K. However, if ever you choose to go for sweetened strawberries, the calories can be as high 200 calories.

But just like anything else, you should eat these in moderation since even unsweetened strawberries already have natural sugar.

According to the American Heart Association, women should be limited to only about 6 teaspoons of sugar per day and for men, 9 teaspoons of sugar per day.

 

Strawberry and Diabetes

Strawberry_and_Diabetes

With strawberries containing natural sugars, many are curious as to whether people with diabetes can eat strawberries.

The good news is that you can; however, it’s better to go for unsweetened strawberries and at the same time do not eat too much of this fruit. One of the nice things about eating strawberries is that they have a lower carbohydrate content compared to other food.

For example, if you will eat a 1 cup serving, you only get 11 grams of carbohydrates.

Health experts highly recommend that people with diabetes should limit themselves to eat no more than two cups of strawberries.

Aside from the previous health benefits mentioned, strawberries are also known to have antioxidant properties which can protect the body against chronic diseases.

In fact, eating strawberries and adding them to your diet can prevent specific complications that are usually associated with diabetes like, for example, cardiovascular diseases.

So even if you are diabetic you can still eat strawberries, but you should only eat them in moderation.

 

Using Strawberries in Your Recipe

To get the nutrients found in this fruit, you can add strawberries to any meal that you want to create.

You can either buy fresh strawberries, eat them right away or add strawberries to your recipes. There are various recipes that you might want to try to incorporate the use of this fruit.

Whether you make strawberry juice or a shake or a meal that contains strawberries, there are several choices to choose from. You can even create your own pancakes and add strawberries to them.


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How Many Carbs are in Strawberries
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How Many Carbs are in Strawberries
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Strawberries will always be the favorite fruit, not just of kids but even of adults. From ice cream to fruit shakes, every person simply loves strawberries. No wonder almost all kinds of food products out there will have a strawberry flavor counterpart.
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